consumer behavior

Classifying, Profiling and Predicting User Behavior in the Context of Location Based Services

Author: 

Vasilios Koutsiouris, Adam Vrechopoulos, Georgios Doukidis

Abstract: 

Motivated by the technology evolutions and the corresponding changes in user-consumer behavioral patterns,this study applies a Location Based Services (LBS) environmental determinants’ integrated theoretical frameworkby investigating its role on classifying, profiling and predicting user-consumer behavior. For that purpose, alaboratory LBS application was developed and tested with 110 subjects within the context of a field trial setting inthe entertainment industry. Users are clustered into two main types having the “physical” and the “social density”determinants to best discriminate between the resulting clusters. Also, the two clusters differ in terms of their spatialand verbal ability and attitude towards the LBS environment. Similarly, attitude is predicted by the “location”, the“device” and the “mobile connection” LBS environmental determinants for the “walkers in place” (cluster #1) andby all LBS environmental determinants (i.e. those determinants of cluster #1 plus the “digital” and the “socialenvironment” ones) for the “walkers in space” (cluster #2). Finally, the attitude of both clusters’ participants towardsthe LBS environment affects their behavioral intentions towards using LBS applications, with limited, however,predicting power observed in this relationship.

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Published Date: 

November, 2016

E-Tail Atmospherics: A Critique Of The Literature And Model Extension

Author: 

Pookie Sautter, Michael R. Hyman, Vaidotas Lukošius

Abstract: 

Physical stores provide the main context for studies on retail atmospherics. Because e-tail stores differ meaningfully from physical stores, e-tail atmospherics is a distinct research domain. Eroglu, Machleit, and Davis (2001) provide a framework for the study of e-tail atmospherics. We extend that framework by introducing the concept of dual environments, integrating multidisciplinary research on virtual environments, and making conceptual and methodological suggestions for future e-tail atmospherics research.

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Published Date: 

February, 2004

Online Shopping Acceptance Model — A Critical Survey Of Consumer Factors In Online Shopping

Author: 

Lina Zhou, Liwei Dai, Dongsong Zhang

Abstract: 

Since the late 1990s, online shopping has taken off as an increasing number of consumers purchase increasingly diversified products on the Internet. Given that how to attract and retain consumers is critical to the success of online retailers, research on the antecedents of consumer acceptance of online shopping has attracted widespread attention. There has yet to be a holistic view of online shopping acceptance from the perspective of consumers. In this research, we conducted an extensive survey of extant related studies and synthesized their findings into a reference model called OSAM (Online Shopping Acceptance Model) to explain consumer acceptance of online shopping. Our literature survey reveals that a myriad of factors have been examined in the context of online shopping and mixed results on those factors have been reported. The proposed model helps reconcile conflicting findings, discover recent trends in this line of research, and shed light on future research directions.

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Published Date: 

February, 2007

Importance Of Cultural And Risk Aspects In Music Piacy: A Cross-National Comparison Among University Students

Author: 

Dr. Marc Fetscherin

Abstract: 

Using a conceptual model of piracy, this paper identified four categories of factors which influence consumer behavior with respect to music piracy: economic, demographic, risk, and culture. A particular emphasis was placed on the importance of cultural and risk aspect in music piracy in this paper. It takes into account a large sample of micro-level behavioral data of university students from the U.S. and Switzerland. We show that despite the fact that these countries are two western, industrialized and technologically advanced nations, students have differences in national culture and they view and treat copyright differently, which ultimately affects the propensity to engage in music piracy. Our results show that consumer behavior can differ even among developed and technologically advanced countries. We show that compared to Swiss students, American students are more likely to engage in music piracy. With respect to the demographic factors, male students are more prone to piracy, whereas older students are less likely to engage in such activity. Finally, the key risk variables perceived probability of getting caught when conducting such illegal activity and the resulting penalty to be paid are negatively associated with music piracy behavior. This paper provides important insights which can be used to have tailored policies to alleviate piracy behavior in each country.

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Published Date: 

February, 2009

The Moderating Role Of Cognitive Fit In Consumer Channel Preference

Author: 

Eric Brunelle, Ph.D.

Abstract: 

Past studies showed that, to deploy the best possible consumer interface, companies must pay close attention to the factors and the consumer behavior that lead to channel preference. This study presents the results of an experiment designed to improve our knowledge of consumer channel preference by testing cognitive fit theory in a commercial context. Data from two different samples (749 students dealing with the process of buying a computer from a well-known electronic goods retailer and 290 union members attempting to buy an airplane ticket from a well-known travel agency) were analyzed. Our results show that the cognitive fit level, or the fit between how information is presented to the consumer (i.e., online store vs. bricks-and-mortar store of the same retailer) and the nature of the problem to be solved (i.e., the information search task), moderates the relationship between the individual characteristics and product characteristics identified in past studies and consumer channel preference. The findings of this research support cognitive fit theory in a commercial context and open up a new way of explaining consumer channel preference. Theoretical and managerial implications, limitations on the study and future research directions are discussed.

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Published Date: 

August, 2009
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