Mobile Banking

The Roles of Form and Function in Utilitarian Mobile Data Service Design

Author: 

Achim Botzenhardt , Ye Li, Alexander Maedche

Abstract: 

Mobile devices, as well as mobile data services (MDS), have become powerful aids in our daily life. Starting with simple communication services, MDS now offer a solution for almost every private and business life demand. The market for MDS has become very competitive, and continuously increasing consumer demands are putting pressure on MDS providers. Recently, the design of mobile devices and services has received much attention, since it provides vast opportunities for differentiating offerings and for gaining a competitive advantage. However, the concrete application of design often leads to semantic confusion. Based on Wixom and Todd’s [2005] theoretical integration of user satisfaction and technology acceptance, and by conceptualizing form and function as the two major components of design, we propose a theoretical model that specifically investigates which MDS design characteristics influence users’ satisfaction and, subsequently, their behavioral intention. We tested our model empirically by means of partial least square (PLS) analysis, using a sample of 2,295 responses from utilitarian MDS users in the mobile banking context. The findings reveal that both components of design – form and function – were positively associated with satisfaction. MDS consumer age and the MDS usage frequency moderated the relationship between form and satisfaction.

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Published Date: 

August, 2016

FACTORS AFFECTING INDIVIDUALS TO ADOPT MOBILE BANKING: EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FROM THE UTAUT MODEL

Author: 

Chian-Son Yu

Abstract: 

Fast advances in the wireless technology and the intensive penetration of cell phones have motivated banks to spend large budget on building mobile banking systems, but the adoption rate of mobile banking is still underused than expected. Therefore, research to enrich current knowledge about what affects individuals to use mobile banking is required. Consequently, this study employs the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) to investigate what impacts people to adopt mobile banking. Through sampling 441 respondents, this study empirically concluded that individual intention to adopt mobile banking was significantly influenced by social influence, perceived financial cost, performance expectancy, and perceived credibility, in their order of influencing strength. The behavior was considerably affected by individual intention and facilitating conditions. As for moderating effects of gender and age, this study discovered that gender significantly moderated the effects of performance expectancy and perceived financial cost on behavioral intention, and the age considerably moderated the effects of facilitating conditions and perceived self-efficacy on actual adoption behavior.

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Published Date: 

May, 2012

Mobile Banking Adoption: Application Of Diffusion Of Innovation Theory

Author: 

Ibrahim M. Al-Jabri, M. Sadiq Sohail

Abstract: 

Many banks in Saudi Arabia are starting to offer banking services through mobile phones. However, not many studies investigate the factors that may help the bankers to design mobile services, which are suitable for and adoptable by bank customers. This study fills this gap and examines a number of factors affecting the mobile banking adoption. Using Diffusion of Innovation as a baseline theory, data are obtained from 330 actual mobile banking users. It is found that relative advantage, compatibility, and observability have positive impact on adoption. Contrary to the findings in extant literature, trialability and complexity have no significant effect on adoption. Perceived risk has a negative impact on adoption. The findings of this study will have practical implications for banking industry in Saudi Arabia.

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Published Date: 

November, 2012
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